High-Banking Simply Stated

G

Guest

Guest
You know a lot has been posted about building Bankers and such but not much has been posted on how to work them. I think this can be a good topic and can be a great help to people just starting out. It has struck me that there are a lot of experienced people on site each and every one of us has a few tricks that makes the game a little bit easier.

High-Banking simply stated.


To know how much dirt you have moved. Measure the length of the your dig. For example, the trench may measure 2 meters long. Measure the width of the trench. The same trench may be 1 meter wide. Measure the depth, of the trench . In this example the depth will be 1 meter deep. Multiply the length (L) times the width (W) times the height (H). The formula looks like this: LxWxH to calculate the volume of the trench the formula would be 2 x 1 x 1 = 2 cubic meters
.
1= Dont buy cheap buy quality which turns out cheaper in the long run
.
2= Work in your own style and pace. In this way you will enjoy the experience and be able to work longer.

3= Know how to pan more so how to finish off. Learn the back wash when finishing of a pan.

4= Never put overburden on top of un-worked ground put it behind you on ground that has been worked..

5=Be aware of heavy mineralisation which can and will clog your system and shoot the gold out the end of your unit. Clean out often in this situation.

6= Test pan the area you are working as you work. No point putting ground through if it has no gold in it.

7= Always backfill your work and flatten your rock pile. This makes the dig area look respectable.

8= its a good idea not to use a shot handle shovel but go for a long handle rounded blade shovel. Your back will thank you for it. Having a rounded nose on the shovel blade you get a lot less resistance in rocky areas by comparison to a flat blade shovel.

9= To keep gear clean of any type of oils. New gear must be washed with biodegradable detergent.

10= It is easier to take the water to the dirt, than the dirt to the water. This will cut your work load by half. Remember You only get back from what you put through.

11= The angle of the bottom sluice in relation to the size gold you are working. Course gold hard and fast. Fine gold low and slow. That the rule I work too.

12= when pumping distance say up to and over 100 meters start the run at 4x 20 meter lengths of 2 inch lay flat reducing back to one and a half inch lay flat for the rest. This cuts down on water friction within the hose.

13= In your lay flat make sure there are no kinks in the hose between the pump and unit. This will have an effect on operational pressure.

14= The pumps pickup hose (from the pump to water supply} this hose should have a smooth boar on the inside. If it does not the ribbed hose will suck air one day and make your pumps output very poor.

15= respect anothers mans dig try and keep a respectable distance from any one else working the same area.

The above is the style and manner to which I work. There is proudly more that I can add like keeping your feet dry in the winter. But I think the above is a good start for any one kicking off so to speak. For our more experienced guys it would be good if you can add a bit to this.
 
Joined
Oct 5, 2015
Messages
70
Reaction score
17
Jembaicumbene said:
You know a lot has been posted about building Bankers and such but not much has been posted on how to work them. I think this can be a good topic and can be a great help to people just starting out. It has struck me that there are a lot of experienced people on site each and every one of us has a few tricks that makes the game a little bit easier.

High-Banking simply stated.


To know how much dirt you have moved. Measure the length of the your dig. For example, the trench may measure 2 meters long. Measure the width of the trench. The same trench may be 1 meter wide. Measure the depth, of the trench . In this example the depth will be 1 meter deep. Multiply the length (L) times the width (W) times the height (H). The formula looks like this: LxWxH to calculate the volume of the trench the formula would be 2 x 1 x 1 = 2 cubic meters
.
1= Dont buy cheap buy quality which turns out cheaper in the long run
.
2= Work in your own style and pace. In this way you will enjoy the experience and be able to work longer.

3= Know how to pan more so how to finish off. Learn the back wash when finishing of a pan.

4= Never put overburden on top of un-worked ground put it behind you on ground that has been worked..

5=Be aware of heavy mineralisation which can and will clog your system and shoot the gold out the end of your unit. Clean out often in this situation.

6= Test pan the area you are working as you work. No point putting ground through if it has no gold in it.

7= Always backfill your work and flatten your rock pile. This makes the dig area look respectable.

8= its a good idea not to use a shot handle shovel but go for a long handle rounded blade shovel. Your back will thank you for it. Having a rounded nose on the shovel blade you get a lot less resistance in rocky areas by comparison to a flat blade shovel.

9= To keep gear clean of any type of oils. New gear must be washed with biodegradable detergent.

10= It is easier to take the water to the dirt, than the dirt to the water. This will cut your work load by half. Remember You only get back from what you put through.

11= The angle of the bottom sluice in relation to the size gold you are working. Course gold hard and fast. Fine gold low and slow. That the rule I work too.

12= when pumping distance say up to and over 100 meters start the run at 4x 20 meter lengths of 2 inch lay flat reducing back to one and a half inch lay flat for the rest. This cuts down on water friction within the hose.

13= In your lay flat make sure there are no kinks in the hose between the pump and unit. This will have an effect on operational pressure.

14= The pumps pickup hose (from the pump to water supply} this hose should have a smooth boar on the inside. If it does not the ribbed hose will suck air one day and make your pumps output very poor.

15= respect anothers mans dig try and keep a respectable distance from any one else working the same area.

The above is the style and manner to which I work. There is proudly more that I can add like keeping your feet dry in the winter. But I think the above is a good start for any one kicking off so to speak. For our more experienced guys it would be good if you can add a bit to this.

Great advice, good to be learning from the experienced. Thanks for taking your time to help.

Cheers :D
 

Tathradj

Doug
Joined
Feb 17, 2014
Messages
10,743
Reaction score
13,140
Location
Now in Bega, NSW
A very well laid out list. Well Done.
One I must add,
Do not discharge directly into a water course. Setup a distance from the water's edge then build a settling pond/race to filter your discharge.
That way you will not cause excessive turbidity of the water course attracting the ire of an inspector.
 
G

Guest

Guest
Tathradj said:
A very well laid out list. Well Done.
One I must add,
Do not discharge directly into a water course. Setup a distance from the water's edge then build a settling pond/race to filter your discharge.
That way you will not cause excessive turbidity of the water course attracting the ire of an inspector.

Good point mate and a very important one. J.
 
G

Guest

Guest
What your pumping station should look like.

1= have a level platform for your pump to sit on. If your pump runs at an angle the oil cut off may stop your pump or you could bugger the motor completely.

2= I consider 2..5 meters of pump pick up hose plenty you dont need a longer peace. Spend a little extra and get smooth boar any irrigation shop should sell it.

3= out of a bit of shade cloth make a sock that will fit over the pumps pickup hose foot valve. This will stop any junk getting into the system.

4= try and keep the foot-valve off the creek/river bottom by an inch or so.

5= from the pump to the lay-flat I run a short length of 1 inch ribbed flexible hose. This stops any kinking at that point and I can run the lay-flat in any direction.

Pumping station

pumping%20station%20Copy_zpsdoksmbmm.jpg


Foot-valve sock

sock%20Copy_zpsjxnu2yr1.jpg
 

AtomRat

Art
Joined
May 22, 2014
Messages
5,140
Reaction score
5,951
Location
Katazone, VIC
You remind me a lot of the blokes who taught me highbanking jemba, very exact and to the point with what to do and how to do it. Its an art :)

I bet you haul your gear where others dont, and by whatever means possible ;)
 
G

Guest

Guest
I do indeed, i will do a section on the gear i use to walk in extra.cheers mate thanks
 

bundyjd

John
Joined
Sep 10, 2014
Messages
356
Reaction score
341
Location
Canberra, ACT
I like the shade cloth sock idea, I just need to find some that is more open weave than the stuff I have lying around at home.

And figure out how to stitch it together.....

Actually, that would be a good little earner for somebody with a bit of spare time and a decent sewing machine - there must be a lot of people on here and other forums with highbankers & pumps that could use one. I know I'd buy a couple if the price was reasonable......
 
G

Guest

Guest
bundyjd said:
I like the shade cloth sock idea, I just need to find some that is more open weave than the stuff I have lying around at home.

And figure out how to stitch it together.....

Actually, that would be a good little earner for somebody with a bit of spare time and a decent sewing machine - there must be a lot of people on here and other forums with highbankers & pumps that could use one. I know I'd buy a couple if the price was reasonable......

I just stapled mine up took about 10 min to make. it is a good idea to put a draw rope in the sock so you can pull it tight around the valve. cheers mate J.
 
G

Guest

Guest
Reeks said:
Good thread Jem.
I sit my pickup strainer in a submersed bucket in the creek (usually layed on its side) so it only picks up clean water.
A big snapper lead in the strainer stops the hose from floating the pickup.

Yep good tip mate thanks.
1449017644_thumb.jpg
 

[email protected]

Dustin
Site Sponsor
Joined
Apr 3, 2013
Messages
5,055
Reaction score
4,031
Location
Redcliffe, QLD
great list mate, number 15 that's a ripper none of that around here..... I start in a spot the next day you will come back to 10 blokes digging right there for no other reason other than you where :)

i'm not so sure about the sock restriction myself, i think that setup would create alot of extra work for your pump if you needed any decent volume i'm sure you've worked out where you can use it and where you cant but with my setup i know with my 2.5 inch pickup i tried running a 2 inch foot valve and it was a huge difference in volume capacity and throttle required for volume so i use a 3 inch now and have no restriction mind you a 2cm rock can fit in the impeller without damage :)

I'm not saying what you are recommending is wrong just that there are specific devices i.e. foot valves that are made to keep junk out and allow correct flow for each pickup hose size and each size pump. hope that makes sense?
 
G

Guest

Guest
The sock acts as a filter, the screen size must not be close woven the low grade shade cloth is just right. I been using this stuff for years with no noticeable loss in pressure or pump performance. But in saying that it dose depend on a few other factors weather you use a strainer or not. Water quality and cleanness, weather you are soak hole pumping or not, {see photos below} last what type of jetting system you are running. And you could even throw distance in amongst that lot. I dont use a strainer/sock on my 5.5 Honda but then the foot-valve is suspended above the bottom, the water been quite deep and running clean. So yes you quite right in part in what you say. But for me I do recommend the use of a sock for ordinary use. It will keep the pump, lay-flat & jetting clear of fine silt and rubbish. Really on the new self- priming pumps you dont need to run a foot valve at all but I still do. It takes the pressure off the pump at start up time when the pump is trying to pick up the water. Thanks for the input mate it is always good to hear another point of view. J.

Hand dug Pond for water supply.

100_1345%20Medium_zps5xgvxzll.jpg


Backpack banker running water which is as bad as you can get. full of clay. The discharged water from the banker was been filtered through the sand before reentering the water hole for reuse.

100_1348%20Copy%20Copy_zpskittntdf.jpg
 
G

Guest

Guest
I should have add this bit about pumps to my last post.

Pumps, I have made mention about self-priming pumps. As mentioned a self-priming pump does not require a foot valve. Whereas a non-self-priming pump dose. Most small pumps sold today are self-priming but there are a few around that are not. To tell if the pump is self-priming place it on a bench and have a look in the pickup port {where the hose is fitted to pump for water supply to pump} there should be a valve {rubber flap} on the back side of the port. Where as in a non -self-priming pump there is none. On both types of pumps you still need to charge the pump chamber with water before starting the pump. This information is for people who may buy second-hand if the pump is new ask the dealer if it self-priming.

Shovels,

what type shovel would I use and why. When selecting a shovel I go for the long handle type with a round blade with a tapered handle at the top. Picking the right shovel is very important remember you are going to be swinging it all day. The goose neck where the blade and handle meet must be at the right angle just a few degrees out and it will make a big difference to your digging style and your back will pay the price. Try different types making sure the shovel feels comfortable in your hands you will know which one is right for you. Why a rounded blade you may ask. With the rounded blade you get a lot less resistance while digging in a rocky area by comparison to a flat blade shovel. Do not use the shovel as a crowbar if the handle is made of wood you must sand it down and oil the handle at least twice a year, the oil will seep into the handle and will not interfere with your prospecting. Wood and fiberglass splinters can be a real pain literally. I use the Cyclone post hole type of shovel I find it quite good with the blade been the right angle and giving a long life by comparison.

100_0392%20Copy_zpsceklo9nf.jpg


100_0393%20Copy_zpsstpcz6wx.jpg


All the advice I am posting is based on how I work, but there are a lot of different ways people go about prospecting. So take the time and study what they are doing it may suite you better. Remember what is right for me may not be right for you.
 

AtomRat

Art
Joined
May 22, 2014
Messages
5,140
Reaction score
5,951
Location
Katazone, VIC
Have you tried the long handled spears n jackson bunning gravel shovel jemba? It has a point and works very well. Same basic rules, dont lever with it but break through the rock gently. Works a damn treat for me and mines lasted 2 years now and still going hard. Ive got a backup but its not needes yet :)
 
G

Guest

Guest
Mate I got to say I havent but my word they sound interesting. I will check them out got to go to Bunnings tomorrow thanks digger.
1449123291_thumb.jpg
 

Latest posts

Top