Thought of the Day...

WalnLiz

Wal nLiz
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Was thinking of starting a thread where members could express their "thought of the day."
Doesn't necessarily have to be prospecting related and can be anything that you find inspirational
or motivational as this COVID Virus has left many with the light dimmer switch set to low rather than
full on brightness. Feel free to add your "Thought of the day" to the thread....I'll start it off.


Wal's thought of the day...."a prospector."

Prospecting is a bit like baking a cake. Take a teaspoon of research and a heaped tablespoon of inspiration
and anticipation, blended with a thrill for adventure and stir until well mixed. Place into a camp oven and
rest onto the glowing coals of an evening campfire, while sitting back in that favourite chair gazing in awe
at the million star accommodation surrounding us, waiting for that shooting star that a wish can be made upon.
Awaken to the rays of dawn with the hope that wish has been answered, and a shining light illuminates a path
to that treasure we are seeking.....A well baked cake can leave everlasting memories of loved ones and friends,
that will be imprinted into the soul for eternity and forms a passion that will always be held close to the heart
of what we identify ourselves with...."a prospector".


Lets see if we can add as many thoughts as possible . Cheers Wal.
 
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Simmo

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Gold Gambler.

A very good Gold miner friend of mine said to me one day...
"Yeah, I 'spose we a bit like a Gold Gambler and I aint put one penny in one of them pokies.. or casino's"

Perplexed, I said, "what do you mean Gold Gambler if you don't gamble??"

She looks over yonder and says... 'See that creek there and that flat beyond the corner??'

'Aha, yup' I says.

"Well I'm gonna chuck $50,000 at it and hope it pays off in the sluice plant"

Aha!! Gold Gambler YUP!' I says!


LOL! Reading back on this half hour later.... I doubt that it makes any sense to anyone but me??!!
It just makes me smile when I think of that moment!
I will delete my post later!!!
Carry on!!
 
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Hawkear

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I have this thought almost every day when I wake to see her.
She has heart failure, liver failure, kidney failure, arthritis in her hips.
A few months ago she nearly died and was only revived after a rush trip to the emergency treatment centre and being put on oxygen.
She now lives on pills which she must take every day.
It amazed me after she got home that she was out catching rabbits again 4 days later and tried to sneak one back into our house. She didn't ask for any sympathy, special consideration or even care that she was sick she just kept doing what she was born to do.
I also think about that a lot when I hear people whinge.
 

WalnLiz

Wal nLiz
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I have this thought almost every day when I wake to see her.
She has heart failure, liver failure, kidney failure, arthritis in her hips.
A few months ago she nearly died and was only revived after a rush trip to the emergency treatment centre and being put on oxygen.
She now lives on pills which she must take every day.
It amazed me after she got home that she was out catching rabbits again 4 days later and tried to sneak one back into our house. She didn't ask for any sympathy, special consideration or even care that she was sick she just kept doing what she was born to do.
I also think about that a lot when I hear people whinge.

A sign of true strength and determination...a lot can be learned from her mate.
 
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I have this thought almost every day when I wake to see her.
She has heart failure, liver failure, kidney failure, arthritis in her hips.
A few months ago she nearly died and was only revived after a rush trip to the emergency treatment centre and being put on oxygen.
She now lives on pills which she must take every day.
It amazed me after she got home that she was out catching rabbits again 4 days later and tried to sneak one back into our house. She didn't ask for any sympathy, special consideration or even care that she was sick she just kept doing what she was born to do.
I also think about that a lot when I hear people whinge.
A glass half full always beats one half empty. I have lived where I watched scores of orphan children as young as 6 years old going through rubbish bins at night for their daily meal, to live another few days. Life can be hard - but there is usually someone else somewhere doing it harder. The average life span of people for the entire world has doubled in the last hundred years - it was 40 for an aborigine or Ballarat miner (in many cases only a few years once they got onto underground drilling) - in 1925 a quarter of children born in Dublin were dead by age 5. I know from what I have seen that in some of those countries, if I was a parent I might risk a sea crossing in a leaky boat for my children as an alternative to starvation, permanent brain damage and early death. I think we should keep that in mind when we talk of "economic" refugees - that "economic" often means "able to continue to live" - it may not be an answer to the larger problem, but it is often the answer for the individuals involved, and who am I to judge them for trying? I put myself slightly right in politics, but I still have these mental images - one summer where I was, 50,000 children died of starvation in a drought - in a rural area perhaps twice the size of Sydney. In another place I remember how each morning the body collection crews would collect the daily scores of corpses off the footpaths that had died overnight (there are some things that you can never un-see - those still little bundles of rags as you went into the street).

Make the best of what you have and can do - look at those cheerful paralympic athletes, who really don't see themselves at any disadvantage - because that is something that is ultimately in the mind of the individual..

we only die once.jpg
 
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Very deep thoughts Goldie and i am sorry that you had to witness those events. Thank you for reminding us just how lucky we are to live in this beautiful country and breathe fresh air, drink fresh water, eat fresh food on a daily and sometimes trice daily. We have a lot to be thankful for.
I have a quote for my own life- " You've got it, get on with it and do the best you can!" Kindest Regards Mackka
 

mbasko

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I have this thought almost every day when I wake to see her.
She has heart failure, liver failure, kidney failure, arthritis in her hips.
A few months ago she nearly died and was only revived after a rush trip to the emergency treatment centre and being put on oxygen.
She now lives on pills which she must take every day.
It amazed me after she got home that she was out catching rabbits again 4 days later and tried to sneak one back into our house. She didn't ask for any sympathy, special consideration or even care that she was sick she just kept doing what she was born to do.
I also think about that a lot when I hear people whinge.
“The average dog is a nicer person than the average person.” – Andy Rooney
 
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Very deep thoughts Goldie and i am sorry that you had to witness those events. Thank you for reminding us just how lucky we are to live in this beautiful country and breathe fresh air, drink fresh water, eat fresh food on a daily and sometimes trice daily. We have a lot to be thankful for.
I have a quote for my own life- " You've got it, get on with it and do the best you can!" Kindest Regards Mackka
I don't know that it was necessarily negative in the long-term for me personally (one had to steel oneself at the time), as it made me appreciate what I had, and gave me some empathy for those who did not. And working with a team of 20 Africans for weeks at a time as the only white gives you insight more into what people share in common (woman, families, children, partying, their friends) more than the cultural differences - and does not make for feeling superior or giving a damn about the colour of a person's skin or their accent (while also showing how there are nasty people in all cultures). Imagine a team of six men digging a trench - one bursts into song, then the others harmonize in background, the thump of their picks setting the beat, happy. I do sometimes feel that people in some of those places (Calcutta, Rwanda, southern Africa, Pakistan, Sumatra, remote Nepal) still had a little more empathy for their neighbours, helped each other more, did not waste time arguing for the sake of their egos (well, not a lot), and still maintained their sense of humour unless they were too weak. Those kids going through the rubbish tins would still smile, joke and play with their peers when they were strong enough. Everyone in a village knew everyone else, compared with some places in the Western world, including parts of some Australian cities, where people do not know the names of their immediate neighbours.

I think attitudes you gain also pass on into your family - my wife and family are health-care workers. worked with new refugees teaching English, went back to Africa to give some assistance on central African aid teams (Aids orphans), but now live happy lives here with their families, never having a moment to get bored. Not necessarily perfect, but appreciating what they have and making the most of life that they can.
 

WalnLiz

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A glass half full always beats one half empty. I have lived where I watched scores of orphan children as young as 6 years old going through rubbish bins at night for their daily meal, to live another few days. Life can be hard - but there is usually someone else somewhere doing it harder. The average life span of people for the entire world has doubled in the last hundred years - it was 40 for an aborigine or Ballarat miner (in many cases only a few years once they got onto underground drilling) - in 1925 a quarter of children born in Dublin were dead by age 5. I know from what I have seen that in some of those countries, if I was a parent I might risk a sea crossing in a leaky boat for my children as an alternative to starvation, permanent brain damage and early death. I think we should keep that in mind when we talk of "economic" refugees - that "economic" often means "able to continue to live" - it may not be an answer to the larger problem, but it is often the answer for the individuals involved, and who am I to judge them for trying? I put myself slightly right in politics, but I still have these mental images - one summer where I was, 50,000 children died of starvation in a drought - in a rural area perhaps twice the size of Sydney. In another place I remember how each morning the body collection crews would collect the daily scores of corpses off the footpaths that had died overnight (there are some things that you can never un-see - those still little bundles of rags as you went into the street).

Make the best of what you have and can do - look at those cheerful paralympic athletes, who really don't see themselves at any disadvantage - because that is something that is ultimately in the mind of the individual..

View attachment 2729


Inspirational Goldierocks and certainly makes you appreciate what we take for granted...
 

WalnLiz

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Tricky one Franko,....Flake, picker, nugget,...these days you couldn't say it needs to be picked up by a detector as with the sensitivity of our current range of detectors some very small "flakes" are now easily picked up. 🤔 Our American friends call anything that is easily picked up a "Picker". But in saying that a gram piece can easily be picked up as well, though they are generally referred to as a "Nugget".

Don't know that I would want to put a weight on the piece to give it the definition of "Nugget", as many want to call a point 3 piece a "test nugget" for the purpose of tuning their detectors. All I can say is if it is of "nuggety" proportions, even as small as point three of a gram, I don't mind referring it as being a nugget.🤔
 

hAyyoUinAU

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Tricky one Franko,....Flake, picker, nugget,...these days you couldn't say it needs to be picked up by a detector as with the sensitivity of our current range of detectors some very small "flakes" are now easily picked up. 🤔 Our American friends call anything that is easily picked up a "Picker". But in saying that a gram piece can easily be picked up as well, though they are generally referred to as a "Nugget".

Don't know that I would want to put a weight on the piece to give it the definition of "Nugget", as many want to call a point 3 piece a "test nugget" for the purpose of tuning their detectors. All I can say is if it is of "nuggety" proportions, even as small as point three of a gram, I don't mind referring it as being a nugget.🤔
A nugget goes CLUNK and picker/flake goes TINK.
And a MUNKER goes THUD. lol
 
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I had a thought, not an original though….but should there be a “size” limit, that one should reach, before a gold find is called a nugget?
It was my first thought when I joined the group - I had never heard of anything smaller than one ounce being called a nugget in the 19thC literature.
 

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